Chlorine(Cl)

Dietary minerals- Chlorine (Cl)

Salt
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Chlorine– in its natural elemental form is a poisonous gas. Rarely found naturally in its gaseous form, this element is generally found combined with other elements in a salt form called chloride. When this element combines with certain other elements such as potassium or sodium, essential minerals are formed. Chlorine is most commonly found in the human diet as sodium chloride or regular table salt.

Chlorine (In the form of chloride ions) combines with elements such as sodium, magnesium, and potassium to maintain proper fluid balance within cells as electrolytes. This helps keep a proper balance of fluids for proper cell hydration and functioning. This nutrient is also essential for healthy joints and connective tissues and in the distribution of hormones throughout the body. Chlorine is essential for normal digestion- it secreted by the stomach in the form of hydrochloric acid in order to regulate the activity of digestive enzymes. Chlorine functions to stimulate the liver to help remove waste and toxins from the body.

nutshell In a nutshell
nutshell Chlorine is most commonly found in the human diet as sodium chloride or regular table salt. Table salt provides enough chlorine in most diets.

Clorine deficiency

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In today’s diet, there is little risk of deficiency. However, deficiencies may occur with excessive loss of fluids through vomiting, diarrhea, and even profuse sweating. Deficiency may result in dehydration, lethargy, loss of appetite, muscle weakness, and alkalosis.

Overdose and Toxicity Symptoms

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While the body typically excretes excess amounts of chloride from the body, continued high amounts in the diet may result in an overdose. This is generally due to the excess sodium in the common chloride compound. Symptoms may include fluid retention, increased blood pressure, and pH imbalance. Excess chloride produces free radicals, leading to cells damage.

Maximum Recommended Allowance and sources of Chlorine

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 Tolerable upper-intake levels are set at a range from 2300 mg/day for young children to 3600 mg/day for teens and adults. Table salt provides enough chlorine in most diets. Other sources include:

• Egg, whole, dried (100g) – 2403 mg;
• Egg, yolk, raw, fresh (100g) – 1267 mg;
• Chicken, liver (100g) -327 mg;
• Egg, whole, raw, fresh (100g) -294 mg;
• Tofu, fried (100g) -106 mg;
• Tomatoes, sun-dried (100g) -104 mg;

It was named “Chlorine” from the ancient Greek word …

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This element is a yellow-green gas that easily combines with other elements to form compounds. Confirmed as an element in 1810, it was named “Chlorine” from the ancient Greek word for “pale green.”